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Growth in childhood predicts hip fracture risk in later life

Growth in childhood predicts hip fracture risk in later life,10.1007/s00198-010-1224-3,Osteoporosis International,M. K. Javaid,J. G. Eriksson,E. Kajan

Growth in childhood predicts hip fracture risk in later life   (Citations: 1)
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Summary  The incidence of hip fracture was estimated in 6,370 women born in Helsinki between 1934 and 1944. Women in the lowest quarter of adiposity gain had an 8.2-fold increase in hip fracture risk compared with those in the highest quarter (p < 0.001). These data point to a relationship between childhood growth and fracture risk during later life. Introduction  Previous findings show that discordance between childhood increase in height and weight is associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures during later life. Methods  We studied 6,370 women born in Helsinki between 1934 and 1944. Each woman’s birth weight and length at birth was recorded, as well as her height and weight through childhood. We identified the occurrence of hip fracture through the National Finnish Hospital discharge register. Results  There were 49 hip fractures in the 6,370 women over 187,238 person-years of follow-up. Hip fracture was associated with increasing Z-scores for height between 1 and 12 years, not matched by a corresponding increase in weight. Therefore, reduction in the Z-score for body mass index was associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Women in the lowest quarter of change in Z-scores for body mass index had an 8.2-fold increase in hip fracture risk (95% CI 1.9 to 35), compared with those in the highest quarter (p < 0.001). Conclusion  Thinness in childhood is a risk factor for hip fracture in later life. This could be a direct effect of low fat mass on bone mineralization, or represent the influence of altered timing of pubertal maturation.
Journal: Osteoporosis International - OSTEOPOROSIS INT , vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 69-73, 2011
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    • ...Very recently, in a study of 6,370 women born in Finland, reduction in body mass index (BMI) gain between 1 and 12 years of age was associated with an increase risk of hip fracture in later life [30]...
    • ...Two potential explanations for this link between reduction in Zscore for BMI and later fracture risk are discussed by the authors: first, a difference in pubertal timing; second, a slowing of growth in response to adverse environmental influences [30]...
    • ...In this study, the timing of puberty as precisely assessed by prospectively recording menarcheal age, was not determined [30], making uncertain whether this important determinant of FN PBM and subsequent premenopausal FN aBMD [12] could be implicated in this...
    • ...The recently published report from Javaid et al. [30] showed that change in BMI during childhood, from 1 to 12 years, was inversely associated with hip fracture risk in later life...
    • ...As potential explanations, the authors suggested either a direct effect of low fat mass on bone mineralization or altered timing of pubertal maturation [30]...
    • ...Taking into account that FN aBMD tracks from early to late adulthood [15, 16], our observation should pertain to the risk of hip fracture in relation with childhood growth [30]...
    • ...In the study by Javaid et al., BW and BMI measured at birth and 1 year of age were not related to hip fracture [30]...
    • ...These data are in accordance and complement further the reported relationship between childhood BMI gain and hip fracture risk in later life [30]...

    T. Chevalleyet al. Pubertal timing and body mass index gain from birth to maturity in rel...

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