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Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics

Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics,10.1111/j.1365-2044.1984.tb08932.x,Anaesthesia,R. S. CORMACK,J. LEHANE

Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics   (Citations: 624)
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Journal: Anaesthesia , vol. 39, no. 11, pp. 1105-1111, 1984
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    • ...Studies on the validity of TL use for nasotracheal intubation have also been published [2, 3]. In addition, the incidence of complications related to lightguided intubation is reported to be low because elevation of the epiglottis by the laryngoscope blade is not required [4, 5]. A method for grading intubation difficulty based on the laryngoscopic view has been suggested by Cormack and Lehane [6], with grade 3 or 4 considered to indicate ...
    • ...Glottis visualization during laryngoscopy was assessed using the Cormack and Lehane classification [6 ]b y an attending anesthesiologist with at least 3 years of anesthesia experience...
    • ...We suggest that the reason for this lack of relation is due to the Cormack and Lehane classification being an assessment of the relative difficulty for direct laryngoscopic intubation, while the principal determinant of good visualization of the glottis during direct laryngoscopy is the alignment of the visual axis of the operator with the glottic axis or laryngeal axis [6]; it is therefore not necessary to align these axes for either ...

    Yozo Manabeet al. The success rate of nasotracheal intubation using lightwand does not d...

    • ...The laryngeal view was graded according to the Cormack‐ Lehane’s scale: grade I, all the vocal cords visible; grade II, only posterior commissure or arytenoids visible; grade III, only epiglottis visible; grade IV, none of the foregoing visible [3]...

    Sevtap Hekimoglu Sahinet al. Using temporomandibular joint mobility to predict difficult tracheal i...

    • ...The attending anaesthesiologist was requested to identify the best achievable Cormack-Lehane (C/L) view [13], modified by Yentis-Lee [14], with direct laryngoscopy (conventional Macintosh laryngoscope) and videolaryngoscopy (C-MAC videolaryngoscope); depending on necessity, the use of external laryngeal manipulation (BURP manoeuvre [15]) at the discretion of the anaesthesiologist was allowed, but not prescribed...
    • ...C/L indicates Cormack and Lehane view,[13] modified by Yentis and Lee;[14]DL: Direct laryngoscopy...
    • ...C/L indicates Cormack and Lehane view, [13] modified by Yentis and Lee;[14]DL: Direct laryngoscopy...

    Erol Cavuset al. A randomised, controlled crossover comparison of the C-MAC videolaryng...

    • ...If required, patients were preoxygenated with facemask or bag–valve–mask ventilation, and, if necessary, anaesthesia was induced in 49 of 80 patients. Appropriate neuromuscular blockade was used in 35 of 80 patients. Next, an anaesthesiologist with at least 6 years experience who was introduced and trained on the C-MAC device, inserted the C-MAC and advanced the tip of the blade towards the vallecula, as known from the original Macintosh laryngoscope. The attending anaesthesiologist was requested to identify the optimal Cormack–Lehane (C/L) view,...

    Erol Cavuset al. The C-MAC videolaryngoscope for prehospital emergency intubation: a pr...

    • ...The quality of visualisation according to Cormack and Lehane [7] and the percentage of glottis opening (POGO) was evaluated [8]...

    Tim Piephoet al. Comparison of the McGrath® Series 5 and GlideScope® Ranger with the Ma...

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