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Phytalgic ® , a food supplement, vs placebo in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

Phytalgic ® , a food supplement, vs placebo in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical

Phytalgic ® , a food supplement, vs placebo in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial   (Citations: 4)
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Introduction  The medicinal treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) is mostly symptomatic to relieve pain and incapacity with analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), drugs with well-known risks. Complementary medicines might reduce the symptoms of OA and decrease the need for NSAIDs. This study tested the effects of a food supplement, Phytalgic®, on pain and function in patients with osteoarthritis and their use of analgesic and NSAIDs. Methods  A randomized double-blind parallel-groups clinical trial compared Phytalgic® (fish-oil, vitamin E, Urtica dioica) to a placebo for three months, in 81 patients with OA of the knee or hip using NSAIDs and/or analgesics regularly. The main outcome measures were use of NSAIDs (in Defined Daily Doses per day - DDD/day) or analgesics (in 500 mg paracetamol-equivalent tablets per week (PET/week) measured each month, and Western Ontario-McMaster University Osteo-Arthritis Index (WOMAC) function scales. Results  After three months of treatment, the mean use of analgesics in the active arm (6.5 PET/week) vs. the placebo arm (16.5) was significantly different (P < 0.001) with a group mean difference of -10.0 (95% CI: -4.9 to -15.1). That of NSAIDs in the active arm (0.4 DDD/day) vs the placebo arm (1.0 DDD/day) was significantly different (P = 0.02) with a group mean difference of - 0.7 DDD/day (95% CI: -0.2 to -1.2). Mean WOMAC scores for pain, stiffness and function in the active arm (respectively 86.5, 41.4 and 301.6) vs the placebo arm (resp. 235.3, 96.3 and 746.5) were significantly different (P < 0.001) with group mean differences respectively of -148.8 (95% CI: -97.7 to -199.9), -54.9 (95% CI: -27.9 to -81.9) and -444.8 (95% CI: -269.1 to -620.4). Conclusions  The food supplement tested appeared to decrease the need for analgesics and NSAIDs and improve the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Trial registration  Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00666523.
Journal: Arthritis Research & Therapy - ARTHRITIS RES THER , vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 1-9, 2009
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    • ...Given the modest results of ordinary pharmacological therapy for osteoarthritis (OA), it was of great interest to see the results by Jacquet and colleagues [1] in the previous issue of Arthritis Research & Th erapy...
    • ...Th e authors present data for Phytalgic® [1] which are considerably more promising than expected and thus should be scrutinized for clinical eff ect and possible bias [3]...
    • ...According to the authors, Phytalgic® consists of capsules containing fi sh oils, urtica dioica, zinc, and vitamin E. Jacquet and colleagues [1] randomly assigned some 81 OA patients to receive either Phytalgic® or a matching placebo consisting of ‘non-fi sh oil’...
    • ...According to ClinicalTrials.gov [2], Jacquet and colleagues [1] considered the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) function scale a secondary outcome measure, and none of the other WOMAC subscales is mentioned in the trial registration...
    • ...With that said, we are now faced with some very promising results of Phytalgic® [1], and further experience is needed to show whether this product on a larger scale will become a relevant treatment option for OA [3,7]...

    Robin Christensenet al. Is Phytalgic ® a goldmine for osteoarthritis patients or is there some...

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