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Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of liver growth of neuroendocrine tumors in an experimental mouse model

Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of liver growth of neuroendocrine tumors in an experimental mouse model,10.1016/j.mri.2009.06.003,Magnetic Resona

Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of liver growth of neuroendocrine tumors in an experimental mouse model   (Citations: 1)
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Liver metastases in patients with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumors represent the main factor of adverse prognosis in this tumor type and thus have a strong effect on the therapeutic strategies. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the noninvasive, in vivo detection of liver metastases. Dedicated MRI protocols suitable for following liver lesion evolution on an experimental model of endocrine tumors could be valuable. An experimental animal model mimicking the clinical situation of intrahepatic dissemination has been designed. The goal of this study was to characterize liver lesions in this athymic nude mouse model and assess the detection sensitivity of MRI using a physiological gating strategy optimized for high magnetic fields.The experiments were performed at 7 T using a dual cardiac–respiratory-triggered multiple spin-echo sequence. This protocol was used to carry out a longitudinal follow-up of hepatic lesions in a group of eight nude mice at different stages: Day 7 (D7), Day 12 (D12), Day 17 (D17) and Day 24 (D24). The hepatic lesion volume fraction (HLVF) was quantified using an adaptive segmentation procedure based on a dual-reference limit. Mean transverse relaxation time T2 values were quantified from multiple spin-echo images.The first lesions were detected at stage D12 on images with 20-ms TE. From D12, the HLVF increased significantly with stage. The mean T2 values also increased significantly at D17 and D24.In conclusion, the level of detection and characterization of liver lesions were performed using a devoted protocol with a dedicated high-field MRI synchronization strategy. In future studies, MRI could be used to monitor the effects of targeted therapies on liver endocrine metastases in preclinical animal models.
Journal: Magnetic Resonance Imaging - MAGN RESON IMAGING , vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 264-272, 2010
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