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Association of Insulin Resistance with de novo Coronary Stenosis after Percutaneous Coronary Artery Intervention in Hemodialysis Patients

Association of Insulin Resistance with de novo Coronary Stenosis after Percutaneous Coronary Artery Intervention in Hemodialysis Patients,10.1159/0001

Association of Insulin Resistance with de novo Coronary Stenosis after Percutaneous Coronary Artery Intervention in Hemodialysis Patients   (Citations: 6)
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Background/Aims: De novo coronary atherosclerosis may be involved in the poor prognosis after percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) in hemodialysis patients. We aimed to clarify the factors associated with de novocoronary lesion in this population. Methods: We enrolled 106 patients on hemodialysis (72 men, 34 women; mean age, 65.4 ± 8.9 years), who had firstly received PCI with bare-metal stents for single coronary lesions and undergone follow-up coronary angiography (CAG) 6 months thereafter. Coronary lesion with stenosis of >50% diameter that was newly recognized at follow-up CAG was defined as de novo coronary stenosis. The values of biochemical parameters were determined as the means of several measurements between PCI and follow-up CAG. Results: Follow-up CAG revealed de novo coronary stenosis in 40 (37.7%) of the 106 hemodialysis patients who had received PCI. Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis showed that de novo coronary lesions were strongly associated with homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR; 1 mM× [μU/ml]: odds ratio, 7.312; p =0.001). This significant association of HOMA-IR with de novo coronary stenosis was recognized in the diabetic and nondiabetic subgroups. Conclusions: Insulin resistance may be involved in the progression of nonculprit coronary atherosclerosis after PCI in hemodialysis patients.
Journal: Nephron Clinical Practice - NEPHRON CLIN PRACT , vol. 109, no. 1, pp. c9-c17, 2008
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