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Animal bite injuries to the head: 132 cases

Animal bite injuries to the head: 132 cases,10.1016/j.bjoms.2005.06.015,British Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery,Marco Rainer Kesting,Frank Höl

Animal bite injuries to the head: 132 cases   (Citations: 8)
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We made a retrospective study of the casenotes of 132 patients with bite injuries who were treated in the departments of craniomaxillofacial surgery in Berlin and Bochum university hospitals. Dogs caused most of the injuries (n=121, 92%) and the lips were most commonly involved. Nearly half the patients had superficial injuries. More than 70% of the patients presented to the clinic within 6h after the bite, and developed fewer wound infections than the patients who presented late. A total of 71 patients were given antibiotics for prophylaxis. Patients who were given amoxycillin with clavulanic acid developed no wound infections. Surgical management included cleansing and primary closure of the wound. Infected wounds were closed primarily after insertion of a drain. Wound cultures showed mainly streptococcus. We concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis is essential for several indications and the antibiotic of first choice is amoxycillin–clavulanic acid. Primary wound closure is an approved principle even in infected wounds.
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    • ...Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid is active against virtually all the bacteria isolated from bite wounds and seems to be the optimal antimicrobial treatment [3]...
    • ... animals commonly affect the upper extremities, especially the hands [1, 4]. On the face, the predominant sites are the lips, chin, nose, and auricles [1, 4]. Involvement of the head, face, and neck is seen in 9‐33% of cases and majority of victims are children [1, 4]. According to Lackmann’s classification of severity of bite our patient falls under stage IVB as there were extensive injury with muscle involvement and bony involvement [3, ...
    • ...Antibiotic prophylaxis should be continued for at least 5 days [3]...

    Hirkani Attardeet al. Wild Boar Inflicted Human Injury

    • ...Kesting et al. concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis is essential for several indications but primary wound closure is an approved principle even in infected wounds [12]...

    Satish M. Kaleet al. Animal bites—should primary reconstruction be the standard treatment?

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