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Growth, Survival and Characterization of cspA in Salmonella enteritidis Following Cold Shock

Growth, Survival and Characterization of cspA in Salmonella enteritidis Following Cold Shock,10.1007/s002849900275,Current Microbiology,Amanda G.

Growth, Survival and Characterization of cspA in Salmonella enteritidis Following Cold Shock   (Citations: 12)
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.   Salmonella enteritidis is a major foodborne microbial pathogen that can grow and survive at low temperatures for a considerable period of time. Increased survival was evidenced from a frozen S. enteritidis culture when treated at 10°C prior to freezing. Western blot analysis with Escherichia coli CspA antibody and analysis of radiolabeled proteins from S. enteritidis cultures after cold shock at 10°C and 5°C showed increased expression of a 7.4-kDa major cold shock protein, CS7.4, similar in size to that reported for E. coli. Cloning followed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the cspA gene from S. enteritidis showed a 100% nucleotide sequence identity in the promoter elements (−35 and −10) and the amino acid sequence encoded by the open reading frame (ORF) with the E. coli cspA gene. However, the differences in the nucleotide sequences between E. coli and S. enteritidis cspA genes in the putative repressor protein binding domain, the fragment 7, and in various segments throughout the upstream 0.642-kbp DNA may contribute to the expression of CS7.4 at less stringent temperatures in S. enteritidis. As in E. coli, the actual role of CS7.4 in protecting S. enteritidis from the damaging effects of cold or freezing temperatures is not yet understood.
Journal: Current Microbiology - CURR MICROBIOL , vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 29-35, 1998
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    • ...Studies on a number of bacteria exposed to a rapid downshift from optimal growth temperature to lower temperatures have revealed induction of synthesis of proteins important for survival or growth at low temperatures (Bayles et al, 1996; Datta and Bhadra, 2003; Goverde et al, 1998; Imbert and Gancel, 2004; Jeffreys et al, 1998; Katzif et al, 2003; Mayr et al, 1996; McGovern and Oliver, 1995; Phan-Thanh and Gormon, 1995)...

    Yvonne C. Chanet al. Physiology and Genetics of Listeria Monocytogenes Survival and Growth ...

    • ...The acute responses of bacterial cells to freezing and thawing, including the effects of prior exposure to cold and other stresses on survival [30- 36], are reasonably well understood...

    Sean C Sleightet al. Increased susceptibility to repeated freeze-thaw cycles in Escherichia...

    • ...(64), S. enteritidis (33), Listeria monocytogenes (2), Bacillus subtilis (69), and Vibrio vulnificus (47), con-...

    BRIAN J. PRENDERGASTet al. Periodic arousal from hibernation is necessary for initiation of immun...

    • ...Loss of viable plate counts caused by environmental factors such as lack of nutrient or suboptimal growth temperature has also been reported in Escherichia coli (Xu et al. 1982), Legionella pneumophila (Hussong et al. 1987), Salmonella (Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999) and Vibris vulnificus (Bryan et al. 1999)...
    • ...In contrast, sustained growth of some pathogens, such as Salmonella (Craig et al. 1998; Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999) and V. vulnificus (Bryan et al. 1999) at 4–6 ◦ C has been reported to...
    • ...approximately 1.0-log decrease in viable plate count during the first 16 h followed by an approximately 4log decline over the next 186 h (Fig. 1). These results suggest that incubation of a V. cholerae O1 culture at 15 ◦ C for 2 h did not trigger an adaptive response for growth at 5 ◦ C. This observation is unlike the results reported for Salmonella (Craig et al. 1998; Horton et a;. 1999; Jeffreys et al. 1998) and V. vulnificus (Bryan et ...
    • ...gies with distinct ‘curved’ shaped cells (Fig. 2). Such elongated cellular morphology following incubation at suboptimal growth temperatures between 10 and 15 ◦ C has been reported for V. vulnificus (Bryan et al. 1999), Salmonella (Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999) and other bacterial species in the environment (Hahn et al. 1999)...
    • ...tained at 35 ◦ C (Fig. 3). This result suggests that the decreased level of CTX may be a response involving slower cellular metabolism at cold temperature or the toxin may be produced as an environmental trigger at temperatures above 30 ◦ C. The major cold shock protein, CS7.4, reported in E. coli (Goldstein et al. 1990) and Salmonella (Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999) was not detected in V. cholerae O1. These results suggest that ...
    • ...The adaptive nature of E. coli and Salmonella cultures at cold temperatures has been attributed to the elevated expression of CS7.4 (Goldstein et al. 1990; Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999; Phadtare et al. 1999; Yamanaka 1999)...
    • ...observation was unlike that described for Salmonella (Jeffreys et al. 1998; Horton et al. 1999) and V. vulnificus (Bryan et al. 1999) in which an adaptive response under similar conditions has been reported...

    Jeffrey W. Carrollet al. Response and tolerance of toxigenic Vibro cholerae O1 to cold temperat...

    • ...CSP genes from Salmonella spp., cspA, cspB, cspC, cspE, and cspH, have been sequenced, and the cold-shock inducibility of cspA and cspB has been reported (6, 19, 20), although their functions have not yet been clearly elucidated...
    • ...was slightly different from that in Escherichia coli (19, 20)...

    BAE HOON KIMet al. Expression of cspH, Encoding the Cold Shock Protein in Salmonella ente...

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