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Sequential changes in Fe, Cu, and Zn in target organs during early coxsackievirus B3 infection in mice

Sequential changes in Fe, Cu, and Zn in target organs during early coxsackievirus B3 infection in mice,10.1385/BTER:91:2:111,Biological Trace Element

Sequential changes in Fe, Cu, and Zn in target organs during early coxsackievirus B3 infection in mice   (Citations: 21)
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In Coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection, the heart and pancreas are major target organs and, as a general host response, an associated immune activation and acute phase reaction develops. Although iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) are involved in these responses, sequential trace element changes in different target organs of infection have not been studied to date. In the present study, Fe, Cu, and Zn were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the plasma, liver, spleen, heart, and pancreas during the early phase (d 1 and 3) of CB3 infection in female Balb / c mice. The severity of the infection was assessed through clinical signs of disease and histopathology of the heart and pancreas, including staining of CD4 and CD8 cells in the pancreas. During infection, the concentrations of Fe, Cu, and Zn changed in the plasma, liver, and pancreas, but not in the spleen and heart. The changes in plasma Cu, Zn, and Fe seemed to be biphasic with a decrease at d 1 that turned into increased levels by d 3. Cu showed similar biphasic changes in the liver, spleen, and pancreas, whereas, for Zn and Fe, this pattern was only evident in the liver. In the pancreas, the reverse response occurred with pronounced decreases in Fe (23%, pp<0.01) at d 3. Although the pathophysiological interpretation of these findings requires further research, the sequential determination of these elements may be of clinical value in enterovirus infections in deciding the stage of disease development.
Journal: Biological Trace Element Research - BIOL TR ELEM RES , vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 111-123, 2003
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    • ...These essential trace elements are crucial for the host defense, including the development of inflammation and the growth and virulence of many microorganisms [2, 14, 15]...
    • ...The observed alterations can reflect either decreased activities of individual cells, a reduction in the total number of effector cells in one or more tissues, or a combination of fewer cells with each cell having diminished capacity [15]...

    Semra Ozdemiret al. The Effect of β-Glucan on Trace Element Levels in Intra-Abdominal Seps...

    • ...Also, a changed Cu/Zn ratio in tissues such as serum and the liver has been reported in viral [7] and malarial [8] infections and has been linked with inflammatory responses [9], but this has not been studied in GI nematode infections...
    • ...One aim of this paper was to explore whether protein deficiency modulated tissue mineral concentrations in infected mice, under conditions where dietary intakes of minerals exceeded recommendation and tissue concentrations were within normal range for the mouse [5, 7]. We observed an intriguing redistribution of tissue minerals as a consequence of both H. bakeri infection and dietary protein deficiency despite adequate mineral intakes...
    • ...Previously, immune and inflammatory responses have been linked with mineral redistribution in viral and malaria infections [7, 8]. In fact the Cu/Zn ratio in serum has been proposed as an indictor of inflammation in several diseases [7, 8]. Thus, GI nematode infections can be added to the growing list of infections that modify tissue mineral...
    • ...Previously, immune and inflammatory responses have been linked with mineral redistribution in viral and malaria infections [7, 8]. In fact the Cu/Zn ratio in serum has been proposed as an indictor of inflammation in several diseases [7, 8]. Thus, GI nematode infections can be added to the growing list of infections that modify tissue mineral...
    • ...This has also been seen during a viral infection [7]...

    T. Tuet al. Tissue Mineral Distributions are Differentially Modified by Dietary Pr...

    • ...The most consistent responses include a decrease in plasma levels of Fe and Zn and an increase in Cu (Beisel, 1998; Ilback et al, 2003b; Ilback et al, 2004; Pekarek and Engelhardt, 1981)...

    Nils-Gunnar Ilbäcket al. Interactions Among Infections, Nutrients and Xenobiotics

    • ...To determine the Hg and Se content in the plasma and Hg content in erythrocytes, the samples were treated as described earlier [14, 15], and element content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS; Perkin-Elmer SCIEX ELAN 6000, Perkin Elmer, Norwalk, CT, USA)...

    Peter Frisket al. Changed Clinical Chemistry Pattern in Blood After Removal of Dental Am...

    • ...In an earlier study, copper overdose markedly increased the EOF of goats and demonstrated apparent time-dose affection [8]...

    Ying Gonget al. Immunotoxicity of Copper Alginate Fibers in Guinea Pigs and Mice

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