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Serotonin 1A receptor deletion does not interact with maternal separation-induced increases in startle reactivity and prepulse inhibition deficits

Serotonin 1A receptor deletion does not interact with maternal separation-induced increases in startle reactivity and prepulse inhibition deficits,10.

Serotonin 1A receptor deletion does not interact with maternal separation-induced increases in startle reactivity and prepulse inhibition deficits   (Citations: 1)
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Rationale  Early life stress is a risk factor for the development of psychopathology in later life. Consequences of adverse life events, however, may depend on the genetic makeup of an individual. Reduced serotonin1A receptor function may predispose to the development of anxiety disorders. Objective  Determine susceptibility of serotonin1A receptor knockout (1AKO) mice on different background strains to the effects of maternal separation (MS) by assessing startle plasticity in adulthood. Methods  1AKO mice on a 129S6 and a Swiss Webster (SW) background were used. MS groups were separated daily from their mother for 180 min/day from postnatal days 2 to 14. Control groups underwent normal animal facility rearing. In adulthood, effects on acoustic startle response, habituation, prepulse inhibition (PPI), and foot shock sensitization were determined. Results  MS increased startle reactivity and reduced PPI in 129S6 mice. These effects of MS were independent of genotype. MS had no effect on the other readouts. In SW mice, MS had no consistent effect on startle reactivity and did not alter startle plasticity in wild type or in 1AKO mice. 1AKO mice did not differ from wild-type mice in startle plasticity. Conclusion  Serotonin1A receptor deletion does not enhance vulnerability to the effects of MS on startle plasticity. The life-long increase in startle reactivity and PPI deficit induced by MS are strain-dependent. Further, the use of startle reactivity and plasticity may have added value in translational studies relating to early life stress.
Journal: Psychopharmacology , vol. 214, no. 1, pp. 353-365, 2011
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    • ... of major psychiatric disorders, especially by focusing on model neurobiological systems (e.g., Heim et al. 1997); (2) empirical demonstration of the relevance of the classic diathesis-stress theory using gene×environment (G×E) experimental designs (e.g., Caspi et al. 2003) and, more recently, epigenetic approaches (e.g., McGowan and Szyf 2010); (3) increased recognition of the adverse psychiatric and biomedical sequelae of ELS (e.g., ...

    Lawrence H. Priceet al. Early life stress and psychopharmacology

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