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Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria

Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria,10.1007/s00253-003-1422-4,Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology,M.

Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria   (Citations: 53)
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M. S. M. Jetten, O. Sliekers, M. Kuypers, T. Dalsgaard, L. van Niftrik, I. Cirpus, K. van de Pas-Schoonen, G. Lavik, B. Thamdrup, D. Le Paslier, H. J. M. Op den Camp, S. Hulthhttp://academic.research.microsoft.com/io.ashx?type=5&id=34813472&selfId1=0&selfId2=0&maxNumber=12&query=
Recently, two fresh water species, " Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans" and " Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis", and one marine species, " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii", of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii" was discovered in the Black Sea, and contributed substantially to the loss of fixed nitrogen. All three species contain a unique organelle—the anammoxosome—in their cytoplasm. The anammoxosome contains the hydrazine/hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzyme, and is thus the site of anammox catabolism. The anammoxosome is surrounded by a very dense membrane composed almost exclusively of linearly concatenated cyclobutane-containing lipids. These so-called 'ladderanes' are connected to the glycerol moiety via both ester and ether bonds. In natural and man-made ecosystems, anammox bacteria can cooperate with aerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria, which protect them from harmful oxygen, and provide the necessary nitrite. The cooperation of these two groups of ammonium-oxidising bacteria is the microbial basis for a sustainable one reactor system, CANON (completely autotrophic nitrogen-removal over nitrite) to remove ammonia from high strength wastewater.
Journal: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - APPL MICROBIOL BIOTECHNOL , vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 107-114, 2003
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