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Intervention Effects of Information and Self-Regulation on Eating Fruits and Vegetables Over Two Years

Intervention Effects of Information and Self-Regulation on Eating Fruits and Vegetables Over Two Years,10.1037/a0018644,Health Psychology,Gertraud Sta

Intervention Effects of Information and Self-Regulation on Eating Fruits and Vegetables Over Two Years   (Citations: 7)
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Objective: This study tested whether an intervention that combined information with self-regulation strategies had a better effect on eating fruits and vegetables than an information-only intervention. Design: Women between age 30 and 50 (N = 255) participated in a 24-month randomized controlled trial comparing two brief interventions: All participants received the same information intervention; participants in the information plus self-regulation group additionally learned a self-regulation technique that integrates mental contrasting with implementation intentions. Main outcome measures: Participants reported in daily diaries how many servings of fruits and vegetables they ate per day during 1 week at baseline, and in the first week, 1, 2, 4, and 24 months after intervention. Results: Participants in both groups ate more fruits and vegetables (0.47 to 1.00 daily servings) than at baseline during the first 4 months after intervention. Two years later, participants in the information plus self-regulation group maintained the higher intake, whereas participants in the information group returned to baseline levels. Conclusion: Adding self-regulation training to an information intervention increased its effectiveness for long-term behavior change.
Journal: Health Psychology - HEALTH PSYCHOL , vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 274-283, 2010
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    • ...To the best of our knowledge, the effect of mental contrasting alone has been studied in the health domain only once with regard to smoking cessation (Oettingen, Mayer et al, 2010), but not for any other health behaviours or in a clinical sample, nor for diabetes self-management specifically (but see: Stadler, Oettingen, & Gollwitzer, 2009, 2010, for studies combining MC with other self-regulation strategies in the health domain)...

    Marieke A. Adriaanseet al. Improving diabetes self-management by mental contrasting

    • ...A similar MCII intervention was used to help women to eat healthier (Stadler, Oettingen, & Gollwitzer, 2010)...

    Angela Lee Duckworthet al. Self‐regulation strategies improve self‐discipline in adolescents: ben...

    • ...Adding planning components to interventions has induced larger effects than brief interventions based solely on information provision (Stadler et al., 2010), motivation (Milne et al., 2002), or asking participants to change their behavior (Wiedemann et al., 2011)...

    Amelie U. Wiedemannet al. Multiple plans and memory performance: results of a randomized control...

    • ...Similar to other intervention work that involves mental contrasting (see e.g., Stadler et al. 2009, 2010; Christiansen et al. 2010; Kirk et al., in press), we led participants to mentally contrast desired futures with high rather than low feasibility, in order to guarantee that mental contrasting would increase, rather than decrease goal commitment...
    • ...having participants generate and name idiosyncratic wishes that they confidently felt capable of fulfilling (Johannessen et al. 2010; Stadler et al. 2009, 2010)...
    • ...For example, mental contrasting led to improved diet and exercise (Johannessen et al. 2010), and in combination with planning out when and where to act (by implementation intentions, Gollwitzer 1999), it led middle-aged adults to exercise more over a period of 4 months (Stadler et al. 2009) and eat more fruit and vegetables over 2 years (Stadler et al. 2010)...
    • ...This standardization of participants’ wishes or tasks is an important addition to previous intervention research where we asked participants to mentally contrast their idiosyncratic wishes of high feasibility (Stadler et al. 2009, 2010)...

    Anton Gollwitzeret al. Mental contrasting facilitates academic performance in school children

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