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Interpersonal Goals and Change in Anxiety and Dysphoria in First-Semester College Students

Interpersonal Goals and Change in Anxiety and Dysphoria in First-Semester College Students,10.1037/a0019400,Journal of Personality and Social Psycholo

Interpersonal Goals and Change in Anxiety and Dysphoria in First-Semester College Students   (Citations: 2)
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Two longitudinal studies examined the associations between interpersonal goals (i.e., self-image and compassionate goals) and anxiety and dysphoria (i.e., distress). In Study 1, 199 college freshmen (122 women, 77 men) completed 12 surveys over 12 weeks. Compassionate goals predicted decreased distress, and self-image goals predicted increased distress from pretest to posttest when distress was assessed as anxiety, dysphoria, or a composite, and when the goals were worded as approach goals, avoidance goals, or a composite. In Study 2, 115 first-semester roommate pairs (86 female and 29 male pairs) completed 12 surveys over 12 weeks. Compassionate and self-image goals predicted distress in same-week, lagged-week, and pretest-to-posttest analyses; effects of compassionate goals remained significant when the authors controlled for several known risk factors. Having clear goals consistently explained the association between compassionate goals but not self-image goals and distress. Results supported a path model in which compassionate goals predict increased support given to roommates, which predicts decreased distress. Results also supported a reciprocal association; chronic distress predicted decreased compassionate and increased self-image goals from pretest to posttest, and weekly distress predicted decreased compassionate goals the subsequent week. The results suggest that compassionate goals contribute to decreased distress because they provide meaning and increase support given to others. Distress, in turn, predicts change in goals, creating the potential for upward and downward spirals of goals and distress.
Journal: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology - PSP , vol. 98, no. 6, pp. 1009-1024, 2010
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    • ...Interpersonally, longitudinal studies of first-semester college roommate dyads show that when people have self-image goals, they give less support and are less responsive to the needs of their roommates, which roommates notice, and reciprocate by providing less support and being less responsive in return (Canevello & Crocker, 2010; Crocker & Canevello, 2008; Crocker, Canevello, Breines, & Flynn, 2010)...

    Jennifer Crocker. Safety in Numbers: Shifting From Egosystem to Ecosystem

    • ...Research has tested these ideas in longitudinal studies of roommates in the first year of college who were unacquainted prior to their roommate assignment (Canevello and Crocker 2010; Crocker and Canevello 2008; Crocker et al. 2010)...
    • ...Chronic compassionate goals predicted decreased distress from pretest to posttest, whereas chronic self-image goals marginally predicted increased distress (Crocker et al. 2010)...
    • ...Crocker et al. (2010) examined whether social support could account for these effects by controlling for both residual change in support given to and received from roommates from pretest to posttest...
    • ...In sum, chronic self-image goals marginally increase anxiety and depression; chronic compassionate goals predict decreased anxiety and depression (Crocker et al. 2010)...
    • ...Within-person analyses show that both compassionate and self-image goals fluctuate from day to day, and these fluctuations are partly explained by relationship partners’ previous responsiveness (Canevello and Crocker 2010 )a nd psychological distress the previous week (Crocker et al. 2010)...

    Jennifer Crocker. The Paradoxical Consequences of Interpersonal Goals: Relationships, Di...

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