Keywords (1)

Academic
Publications
Reassessing the environmental risks of GM crops

Reassessing the environmental risks of GM crops,10.1038/nbt1205-1475,Nature Biotechnology,Les Firbank,Mark Lonsdale,Guy Poppy

Reassessing the environmental risks of GM crops   (Citations: 16)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Journal: Nature Biotechnology - NAT BIOTECHNOL , vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 1475-1476, 2005
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
    • ...Nevertheless, the principle fears expressed by opponents are (i) effects of novel traits/proteins expressed by the GM crop on human health and upon species that use the crop as food, either directly or indirectly and (ii) escape of genes to wild relatives (Firbank et al. 2005)...
    • ...Indeed, studies of gene flow to wild relatives have confirmed that given the opportunity, genes will flow although at low frequencies (Heritage 2003; Firbank et al. 2005)...
    • ...In the EU, procedures for environmental risk assessment and monitoring have developed and become formalised within European Commission’s (EC) directive 2001/18 (Firbank et al. 2005)...

    David Kothamasiet al. Genetically modified organisms in agriculture: can regulations work?

    • ...There is a strong case to be made for reassessing the environmental risks using a small number of large-scale, appropriately powered field studies on a trait-by-trait basis (Firbank et al. 2005)...

    Wenke Liu. Do genetically modified plants impact arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    • ...There is a strong need to reassess environmental risks using a number of large-scale field studies on a trait-by-trait basis (Firbank et al., 2005)...

    Wenke Liu. Effects of Bt transgenic crops on soil ecosystems: a review of a ten-y...

    • ...Small plots and laboratory studies are unlikely to prove useful in such an evaluation, therefore a call has been made for appropriate large scale monitoring, experimentation, and modelling to determine the impact on the landscape from GM trait characteristics (Firbank et al. 2005)...

    Wendy Craiget al. An overview of general features of risk assessments of genetically mod...

    • ...While it proved possible to establish the extent of differences between these two systems at field level [5, 17, 29, 31], these differences were not constant; they could be mitigated by changes to crop management [11] and were sensitive to the scale of cropping at the landscape level [15]...
    • ...Moreover, because the differences observed between GM and non-GM cropping were smaller than those found between crop species [5, 17, 29, 31], it was not clear that the effects of GM cropping were any greater than those involved with other changes in agricultural land management [15]...
    • ...Ecological risk assessments of GM crops are triggered by how the crop has been bred, rather than how it will be used, while for bioenergy crops the effects of cultivation practices, choice of areas and crop species are likely to have bigger environmental impacts than the methods of plant breeding [15]...
    • ...This potential is considered an important risk to biodiversity should the new crop be genetically modified [37, 49], and especially if the crops are located in an area of genetic diversity [15]...
    • ...especially if the switch is also associated with changes to crop management [15]...
    • ...The effects tend to be of a similar order to other changes in agricultural practice [15]...
    • ...The greatest ecological risk of gene flow from crops to wild relatives is that it may reduce the genetic diversity at centres of origin and diversity [15]...

    Les G. Firbank. Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Bioenergy Projects

Sort by: