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Energy and emissions impacts of a freeway-based dynamic eco-driving system

Energy and emissions impacts of a freeway-based dynamic eco-driving system,10.1016/j.trd.2009.01.004,Transportation Research Part D-transport and Envi

Energy and emissions impacts of a freeway-based dynamic eco-driving system   (Citations: 7)
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Surface transportation consumes a vast quantity of fuel and accounts for about a third of the US CO2 emissions. In addition to the use of more fuel-efficient vehicles and carbon-neutral alternative fuels, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions can be lowered through a variety of strategies that reduce congestion, smooth traffic flow, and reduce excessive vehicle speeds. Eco-driving is one such strategy. It typically consists of changing a person’s driving behavior by providing general static advice to the driver (e.g. do not accelerate too quickly, reduce speeds, etc.). In this study, we investigate the concept of dynamic eco-driving, where advice is given in real-time to drivers changing traffic conditions in the vehicle’s vicinity. This dynamic strategy takes advantage of real-time traffic sensing and telematics, allowing for a traffic management system to monitor traffic speed, density, and flow, and then communicates advice in real-time back to the vehicles. By providing dynamic advice to drivers, approximately 10–20% in fuel savings and lower CO2 emissions are possible without a significant increase in travel time. Based on simulations, it was found that in general, higher percentage reductions in fuel consumption and CO2 emission occur during severe compared to less congested scenarios. Real-world experiments have also been carried out, showing similar reductions but to a slightly smaller degree.
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    • ...Improved driving behavior (such as using less acceleration and deceleration while driving) is shown to significantly reduce fuel consumption and emission (see for example Barkenbus (2009); Barth and Boriboonsomsin (2009a))...

    Rami Puziset al. Augmented Betweenness Centrality for Environmentally-Aware Traffic Mon...

    • ...China. E-mail: xuwenda@cis.pku.edu.cn In most of the literatures about eco-driving, only speed ([3], [4]) or both speed and gear [5] are considered as the decisive factors for explaining fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, while most of the simulation systems use simplified traditional traffic flow model, which reduce the credibility of the simulation results...
    • ...The simplest form of vehicle tractive power (kw) can be expressed as follows [4]...

    Wenda Xuet al. A vehicle model for micro-traffic simulation in dynamic urban scenario...

    • ...The dependence of fuel consumption and emissions on how a vehicle is driven has been widely studied [3 - 8]. It is clear that in order reduce the fuel consumption and emissions, driving gently and reducing idling time are key factors...
    • ...Therefore, it is relatively straightforward to design “dynamic eco -driving” systems where optimal speed advice (based on minimizing fuel consumption and emissions) can be communicated to the drivers (see, e.g., [8])...

    Matthew Barthet al. Dynamic ECO-driving for arterial corridors

    • ...In order to achieve this, several researchers studied the dependence of fuel consumption and emissions of vehicles on its trajectory patterns [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. For freeways, the relation between speed and acceleration/deceleration profiles with fuel consumption and emissions has been widely studied [6]...

    Sindhura Mandavaet al. Arterial velocity planning based on traffic signal information under l...

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