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Global potential bioethanol production from wasted crops and crop residues

Global potential bioethanol production from wasted crops and crop residues,10.1016/j.biombioe.2003.08.002,Biomass & Bioenergy,Seungdo Kim,Bruce E. Dal

Global potential bioethanol production from wasted crops and crop residues   (Citations: 225)
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The global annual potential bioethanol production from the major crops, corn, barley, oat, rice, wheat, sorghum, and sugar cane, is estimated. To avoid conflicts between human food use and industrial use of crops, only the wasted crop, which is defined as crop lost in distribution, is considered as feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass such as crop residues and sugar cane bagasse are included in feedstock for producing bioethanol as well. There are about 73.9Tg of dry wasted crops in the world that could potentially produce 49.1GLyear−1 of bioethanol. About 1.5Pgyear−1 of dry lignocellulosic biomass from these seven crops is also available for conversion to bioethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass could produce up to 442GLyear−1 of bioethanol. Thus, the total potential bioethanol production from crop residues and wasted crops is 491GLyear−1, about 16 times higher than the current world ethanol production. The potential bioethanol production could replace 353GL of gasoline (32% of the global gasoline consumption) when bioethanol is used in E85 fuel for a midsize passenger vehicle. Furthermore, lignin-rich fermentation residue, which is the coproduct of bioethanol made from crop residues and sugar cane bagasse, can potentially generate both 458TWh of electricity (about 3.6% of world electricity production) and 2.6EJ of steam. Asia is the largest potential producer of bioethanol from crop residues and wasted crops, and could produce up to 291GLyear−1 of bioethanol. Rice straw, wheat straw, and corn stover are the most favorable bioethanol feedstocks in Asia. The next highest potential region is Europe (69.2GL of bioethanol), in which most bioethanol comes from wheat straw. Corn stover is the main feedstock in North America, from which about 38.4GLyear−1 of bioethanol can potentially be produced. Globally rice straw can produce 205GL of bioethanol, which is the largest amount from single biomass feedstock. The next highest potential feedstock is wheat straw, which can produce 104GL of bioethanol. This paper is intended to give some perspective on the size of the bioethanol feedstock resource, globally and by region, and to summarize relevant data that we believe others will find useful, for example, those who are interested in producing biobased products such as lactic acid, rather than ethanol, from crops and wastes. The paper does not attempt to indicate how much, if any, of this waste material could actually be converted to bioethanol.
Journal: Biomass & Bioenergy - BIOMASS BIOENERG , vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 361-375, 2004
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    • ...In 2004, a global annual production of 731 million tons of rice straw was reported (39), but there has clearly been an increasing trend of global rice production in the last decade (24)...

    Wendy Mussolineet al. The anaerobic digestion of rice straw: A review

    • ...Kim and Dale [24] evaluated the global potential for the production of ethanol from biomass and concluded that rice hulls, wheat straw, corn stover and sugarcane bagasse, in this order, are the most favorable feedstocks in terms of available quantity...
    • ...Kim and Dale [24] believe that the use of agricultural waste-based biomass from corn, barley, oats, rice, wheat, sorghum and sugarcane would be able to increase world production of ethanol by sixteen times without affecting the production of food...

    Clarissa Cruz Perroneet al. Ethanol: An Evaluation of its Scientific and Technological Development...

    • ...The major types of biomass for ethanol production recognized to date are monoculture crops grown on fertile soils (such as sugarcane, corn, soya beans, oilseed rape, switch grass, willow, and hybrid poplar) (Farrell et al. 2006), waste biomass (such as straw, corn stover, and waste wood) (Kim and Dale 2004), and municipal solid waste...
    • ...Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant renewable resource for the productionofalternative biofuels, with200 billiontons producedannually.Ithasa higherproductivityrateper hectare than grains, oil seed, or sugars per unit of biomass produced (Kim and Dale 2004)...
    • ...The production of bioethanol from agricultural residues and hays (wheat, barley, and triticale straws and barley, triticale, pearl millet, and sweet sorghum hays) is an attractive and feasible option (Kim and Dale 2004)...

    Anuj K. Chandelet al. Weedy lignocellulosic feedstock and microbial metabolic engineering: a...

    • ...Algae meal was chosen to have the same ethanol yield as wheat straw since residual algae meal and wheat straw have similar glucan content (Kim and Dale 2003)...

    Kyle Sanderet al. Life cycle analysis of algae biodiesel

    • ...Traditionally, ethanol has been produced from starch and sugar crops such as cassava, rice, wheat, barley, corn grain or sugarcane [6]...

    Sara González-Garcíaet al. Environmental profile of ethanol from poplar biomass as transport fuel...

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