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Biochemical factors regulating the toughening and tenderization processes of meat

Biochemical factors regulating the toughening and tenderization processes of meat,10.1016/0309-1740(96)00065-4,Meat Science,Mohammad Koohmaraie

Biochemical factors regulating the toughening and tenderization processes of meat   (Citations: 152)
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The purpose of this manuscript is to present a brief review of the biochemical basis for longissimus toughening and tenderization processes. Also, to explore the potential technologies that can be developed based on this knowledge to reduce variation in tenderness, thus, improving consumer acceptance of meat. Results suggest that after slaughter longissimus has low to intermediate shear force values (probably tender). Rigor development-induced changes increase its shear force. Maximum toughness is observed between 12 to 24 h post mortem. The toughening process seems to occur equally in all carcasses. Post-mortem storage at refrigerated conditions tenderizes longissimus. Post-mortem tenderization is caused by enzymatic degradation of key myofibrillar and associated proteins. The function of these proteins is to maintain the structural integrity of myofibrils. Current data indicates that μ-calpain is responsible for degradation of these proteins. Unlike the toughening process, there exists a large variation in the rate and extent of tenderization which is responsible for variation in tenderness at the consumer level. Potential strategies for the control of the variation in meat tenderness are discussed.
Journal: Meat Science - MEAT SCI , vol. 43, pp. 193-201, 1996
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