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The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO 2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling

The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO 2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling,10.1016/j.egypro.2009.01.233,Energ

The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO 2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling   (Citations: 4)
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Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions include injecting CO2 in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO2 in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO2 into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO2 storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO2 and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO2 storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO2 in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H2S and SO2) on CO2 storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO2 from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO2 trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO2 alone or co-injection with H2S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO2 with H2S and in particular with SO2 causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO2, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.
Journal: Energy Procedia , vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1783-1790, 2009
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    • ...Therefore it may be economically advantageous to sequester/store CO2 with these constituents in deep geological formations [Knauss et al., 2005; Bachu et al., 2009a; Ellis et al., 2010; Xiao et al., 2009; Crandell et al., 2010]...
    • ...[8] Some of previous reactive transport modeling [e.g., Xu et al., 2007; Xiao et al., 2009] are limited in that only CO2 can be injected in the gaseous state...

    Wei Zhanget al. Modeling of fate and transport of coinjection of H2S with CO2 in deep ...

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