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Learning from animation enabled by collaboration

Learning from animation enabled by collaboration,10.1007/s11251-009-9117-6,Instructional Science,Cyril Rebetez,Mireille Bétrancourt,Mirweis Sangin,Pie

Learning from animation enabled by collaboration   (Citations: 3)
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Animated graphics are extensively used in multimedia instructions explaining how natural or artificial dynamic systems work. As animation directly depicts spatial changes over time, it is legitimate to believe that animated graphics will improve comprehension over static graphics. However, the research failed to find clear evidence in favour of animation. Animation may also be used to promote interactions in computer-supported collaborative learning. In this setting as well, the empirical studies have not confirmed the benefits that one could intuitively expect from the use of animation. One explanation is that multimedia, including animated graphics, challenges human processing capacities, and in particular imposes a substantial working memory load. We designed an experimental study involving three between-subjects factors: the type of multimedia instruction (with static or animated graphics), the presence of snapshots of critical steps of the system (with or without snapshots) and the learning setting (individual or collaborative). The findings indicate that animation was overall beneficial to retention, while for transfer, only learners studying collaboratively benefited from animated over static graphics. Contrary to our expectations, the snapshots were marginally beneficial to learners studying individually and significantly detrimental to learners studying in dyads. The results are discussed within the multimedia comprehension framework in order to propose the conditions under which animation can benefit to learning.
Journal: Instructional Science - INSTR SCI , vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 471-485, 2010
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    • ...We investigated (Rebetez et al. 2005; Rebetez et al. 2008) the cognitive load hypothesis by adding a persistency tool to standard dynamic multimedia materials...
    • ...The answers to Fig 2, question (1) have been summarized above and are detailed in (Rebetez et al. 2005; Rebetez et al. 2008)...
    • ...While the main goal of the previously described study (Rebetez et al. 2005; Rebetez et al. 2008) was to investigate the effects of animated pictures on learning outcomes in individual and collaborative settings (Fig 2, question 1), the questions we address here are aimed at further examining the results obtained from the collaborative setting: How do multimedia variants (static/animated; persistent/not) influence collaborative processes ...
    • ...To further analyse our previous results (Rebetez et al. 2005; Rebetez et al. 2008) on the collaborative process level, we addressed two sub-questions: (1) Do different interaction patterns emerge in the different conditions? (2) Are differences in interaction related to learning outcomes? Accordingly, the first section explains the effects of the animation and snapshots factors on the interaction variables...

    Mirweis Sanginet al. The effects of animations on verbal interaction in computer supported ...

    • ...This paper reports a study conducted to investigate the effectiveness of animated and static pictures under the conditions of individual and collaborative learning (Rebetez, Sangin, Bétrancourt, & Dillenbourg, 2005; Sangin, Rebetez, Dillenbourg, & Bétrancourt, 2005)...
    • ...Our previous research had suggested benefits of animated pictures for collaborative learning on both retention and inference performances (Rebetez et al., 2005; Sangin et al., 2005)...

    Mirweis Sanginet al. Collaborative learning with animated pictures: The role of verbalizati...

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