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Enhanced polyamine accumulation alters carotenoid metabolism at the transcriptional level in tomato fruit over-expressing spermidine synthase

Enhanced polyamine accumulation alters carotenoid metabolism at the transcriptional level in tomato fruit over-expressing spermidine synthase,10.1016/

Enhanced polyamine accumulation alters carotenoid metabolism at the transcriptional level in tomato fruit over-expressing spermidine synthase   (Citations: 1)
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Mohamed Hichem Neily, Chiaki Matsukura, Mickaël Maucourt, Stéphane Bernillon, Catherine Deborde, Annick Moing, Yong-Gen Yin, Takeshi Saito, Kentaro Mori, Erika Asamizu, Dominique Rolin, Takaya Moriguchihttp://academic.research.microsoft.com/io.ashx?type=5&id=42298886&selfId1=0&selfId2=0&maxNumber=12&query=
Polyamines are involved in crucial plant physiological events, but their roles in fruit development remain unclear. We generated transgenic tomato plants that show a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in polyamine content by over-expressing the spermidine synthase gene, which encodes a key enzyme for polyamine biosynthesis. Pericarp-columella and placental tissue from transgenic tomato fruits were subjected to 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for untargeted metabolic profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection for carotenoid profiling to determine the effects of high levels of polyamine accumulation on tomato fruit metabolism. A principal component analysis of the quantitative 1H NMR data from immature green to red ripe fruit showed a clear discrimination between developmental stages, especially during ripening. Quantification of 37 metabolites in pericarp-columella and 41 metabolites in placenta tissues revealed distinct metabolic profiles between the wild type and transgenic lines, particularly at the late ripening stages. Notably, the transgenic tomato fruits also showed an increase in carotenoid accumulation, especially in lycopene (1.3- to 2.2-fold), and increased ethylene production (1.2- to 1.6-fold) compared to wild-type fruits. Genes responsible for lycopene biosynthesis, including phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, were significantly up-regulated in ripe transgenic fruits, whereas genes involved in lycopene degradation, including lycopene-epsilon cyclase and lycopene beta cyclase, were down-regulated in the transgenic fruits compared to the wild type. These results suggest that a high level of accumulation of polyamines in the tomato regulates the steady-state level of transcription of genes responsible for the lycopene metabolic pathway, which results in a higher accumulation of lycopene in the fruit.
Journal: Journal of Plant Physiology - J PLANT PHYSIOL , vol. 168, no. 3, pp. 242-252, 2011
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    • ...Put, Spd and Spm all increased in fruits; higher carotenoid contents accumulated especially lycopene Neily et al. (2010)...
    • ...In another study by Neily et al. (2010), all three PAs increased in transgenic tomato fruits expressing MdSPDS1 under a constitutive promoter, among which Spm showed the least increase...

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