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An estimate of natural volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation since the last glacial maximum

An estimate of natural volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation since the last glacial maximum,10.1016/S1465-9972(00)00023-4,Chemosphere -

An estimate of natural volatile organic compound emissions from vegetation since the last glacial maximum   (Citations: 22)
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Journal: Chemosphere - Global Change Science , vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 73-91, 2001
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    • ...An increase in NMVOC emissions between the LGM and the PI is consistent with vegetation reconstructions [see, e.g., Adams et al., 2001] and model studies of the influence that rising temperatures have on vegetation [e.g., Lathière et al., 2005]...

    J. G. Levineet al. In search of an ice core signal to differentiate between source-driven...

    • ...Model experiments have indicated emissions substantially below present under glacial maximum (cool, low-CO2) conditions, due to the isoprene-temperature response and reduced vegetation productivity [Adams et al., 2001; Lathie`re et al., 2005; Valdes et al., 2005; Kaplan et al., 2006], and correspondingly up to twice as high as present in a warm, high-CO2 world [Sanderson et al., 2003; Lathie`re et al., 2005; Guenther et al., 2006]...
    • ...The modeled global total is about 20% lower than recent estimates for emissions from potential natural vegetation based on the standard algorithms (0.45–0.56 PgC a 1 [Adams et al., 2001; Sanderson et al., 2003; Naik et al., 2004])...
    • ...[10] Simulations that disregard the direct effect atmospheric CO2 concentration has on leaf isoprene metabolism yield substantially reduced isoprene emission in the glacial world, and strongly increased emission in future projections ofclimateandatmosphericCO2levels(Table1andFigure2), in agreement with previous model results [Adams et al., 2001; Sanderson et al., 2003; Lathie`re et al., 2005; Valdes et al., 2005; Guenther et al., 2006; ...

    Almut Arnethet al. CO2 inhibition of global terrestrial isoprene emissions: Potential imp...

    • ...More recently changes in the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere have also been implicated in CH4 variability as well as changes in wetland extent resulting from encroaching ice sheets and changes in sea level for glacial-interglacial transitions [Kaplan, 2002; Adams et al., 2000; Valdes et al., 2005]...
    • ...Adams et al. [2000] used reconstructions of vegetation biome distributions for the Holocene and LGM calculating VOC emissions on the basis of leaf area index, foliage emission rate, and canopy temperatures...
    • ...Adams et al. [2000] suggest that VOCs increased by as much as 20% with a concomitant decrease in the OH sink...
    • ...Adams et al. [2000] found a 57% decrease in global Holocene VOC emissions for an LGM vegetation distribution using a 5C drop in tropical surface temperature...
    • ...Since wetland CH4 emissions, CH4 oxidation rate, and vegetation VOC emissions all appear to show significant sensitivity to temperature [Kaplan, 2002; Johnson et al., 2001; Adams et al., 2000], the questions arise: What is the sensitivity of CH4 mixing ratio to changes in VOC emissions? How does a cooler LGM climatology impact the change in CH4 mixing ratio observed between the early Holocene and the LGM? [30] Experiment N-100 and the ...
    • ...Thus while a 50% reduction in VOC emissions for a CLIMAP LGM is consistent with our results, a smaller drop in VOC emissions, in line with the climate sensitivity reported by Adams et al. [2000], could have occurred in conjunction with a significant drop in tropical CH4 emissions...

    S. L. Harderet al. A global climate model study of CH4 emissions during the Holocene and ...

    • ...However, results of recent modeling work using global biochemical process models, indicated that glacial-interglacial changes in wetland area and CH4 emissions may have been smaller than earlier supposed, and possibly not large enough to effect the observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentrations [Adams et al., 2001; Kaplan, 2002; Valdes et al., 2005]...
    • ...Adams et al. [2001] speculated that large changes in atmospheric CH4 concentrations could be effected through changes in the emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds (RVOCs)...
    • ...[8] Following the hypotheses advanced in the empirical study of Adams et al. [2001], we investigate the potential importance of changing RVOC emissions on the magnitude of the OH sink and consequent atmospheric CH4 concentrations...
    • ...[9] By using a linked set of models that contain a quantitative representation of the physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the production and destruction of CH4 at each step in its cycle, we are able to go beyond Adams et al. [2001] and directly simulate atmospheric CH4 concentrations...
    • ...[40] Our estimates of total global BVOC flux are consistent with Adams et al. [2001] and Valdes et al. [2005], though they differ by up to 30% for individual species...
    • ...All estimates virtually agree on preindustrial emissions of isoprene and terpenes, but diverge more pronouncedly at the earlier periods, with the calculations of Adams et al. [2001] 15% to 30% higher, and Valdes et al. [2005] lower by similar magnitude...
    • ...This study 845 808 817 536 Adams et al. [2001] 903 1089 1104 643 Valdes et al. [2005] 1026 508 a Emissions are given in Tg C yr 1 . GB2016 KAPLAN ET AL.: LATE GLACIAL AND HOLOCENE ATMOSPHERIC METHANE...
    • ...tions could have been driven primarily by changes in the photochemical sink for CH4 rather than changes in the source [Adams et al., 2001; Valdes et al., 2005]...

    Jed O. Kaplanet al. Role of methane and biogenic volatile organic compound sources in late...

    • ...One possible candidate for this is lowered emissions of VOCs from terrestrial ecosystems at the LGM [Adams et al., 2001], but this hypothesized interaction remains untested...
    • ...Overall, the final global LGM CH4 source term was decreased compared to the PI value by 23% (Table 1). [12] Global emissions of isoprene and monoterpene from vegetation were substantially lower at the LGM, being 61% and 44% of their PI values (Table 1), due to reductions in global forest cover and the cooler climate (similar to Adams et al. [2001])...

    Paul J. Valdeset al. The ice age methane budget

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