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Mating patterns and sexual swellings in pair-living and multimale groups of wild white-handed gibbons, Hylobates lar

Mating patterns and sexual swellings in pair-living and multimale groups of wild white-handed gibbons, Hylobates lar,10.1016/j.anbehav.2007.08.012,Ani

Mating patterns and sexual swellings in pair-living and multimale groups of wild white-handed gibbons, Hylobates lar   (Citations: 9)
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White-handed gibbons usually live in monogamous pairs, but at Khao Yai National Park, Thailand groups often contain two adult males. We studied mating and sexual behaviour (i.e. proceptivity, receptivity and attractivity) of 12 females in relation to the females' fertile phases as assessed by faecal progestogen anal- ysis. Females' mating activity, in pairs and multimale groups, exceeded the fertile phase and extended well into gestation and, in one exceptional case, into lactation. Whereas copulation frequency was skewed to- wards one male and peaked during the periovulatory period, no significant difference between fertile and nonfertile phases of the menstrual cycle was detected. Similarly, frequencies of female sexual behaviours, such as proceptivity and receptivity, did not differ across menstrual cycle phases and were common during pregnancy but absent during lactation. However, female attractivity in the form of sexual swellings directly affected copulation frequency, in that copulations were concentrated in the period when females were maximally swollen. Our data suggest that female sexual behaviours do not provide reliable information on the precise timing of the fertile phase to males. Because copulation frequencies were closely associated to sexual swelling stage during both ovarian cycles and pregnancy, we advocate that gibbon females display such visual signals to manipulate male mating behaviour. The results suggest that sexual swellings enable females to mate with multiple males during times when they are not fertile, perhaps to benefit from paternity confusion or to bias copulations towards preferred males when highly fertile to acquire 'good genes'.
Journal: Animal Behaviour - ANIM BEHAV , vol. 75, no. 3, pp. 991-1001, 2008
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    • ...A new immigrant male (new-male polyandry) should have a low probability of paternity, whereas under stable polyandry, both males should have some probability of paternity because females in polyandrous groups reportedly mate with both males, even though mating is skewed (Barelli et al. 2008)...
    • ...This could be due to a strong skew in mating (reported for polyandrous groups of the study population, Barelli et al. 2008), which might provide males with clues about paternity, thereby reducing their risk of killing own offspring...

    Carola Borrieset al. Social monogamy and the threat of infanticide in larger mammals

    • ...We followed 11 habituated gibbon groups that are part of a long-term investigation of gibbon socioecology at the Central Mo Singto study site (Barelli et al. 2007; Barelli et al. 2008; Brockelman et al. 1998; Brockelman 2009; Reichard 2009; Reichard and Sommer 1997)...

    Norberto Asensioet al. Gibbon travel paths are goal oriented

    • ...(Reichard, 2003; Barelli et al., 2007, 2008)...
    • ...least two adult males unrelated to the female and were considered multimale (see also Barelli et al., 2007, 2008)...
    • ...In multimale groups, we distinguished primary and secondary males by their singing and mating patterns, i.e., primary males engaged in duet singing and performed the majority of copulations with the group female (cf., Barelli et al., 2008)...
    • ...However, considering the new findings on gibbons’ sociosexual strategies and the active role females play in mating activity (Barelli et al., 2007, 2008), one plausible explanation of cycling females traveling in the front position might relate to non-ecological factors...

    Claudia Barelliet al. Female white-handed gibbons (Hylobates lar )l ead group movements and ...

    • ...Gibbons are primarily socially monogamous; however, polygynous (Nomascus concolor, Haimoff et al. 1986; Bleisch and Chen 1991; Jiang et al. 1999) and polyandrous (Symphalangus syndactylus, Lappan 2007; Hylobates lar, Barelli et al. 2008) groups are common, and often monogamous groups are non-nuclear families (Palombit 1994; Brockelman et al. 1998; Oka and Takenaka 2001)...

    Belinda L. Burnset al. Social dynamics modify behavioural development in captive white-cheeke...

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