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Dissipation of Proton Motive Force is not Sufficient to Induce the Phage Shock Protein Response in Escherichia coli

Dissipation of Proton Motive Force is not Sufficient to Induce the Phage Shock Protein Response in Escherichia coli,10.1007/s00284-011-9869-5,Internat

Dissipation of Proton Motive Force is not Sufficient to Induce the Phage Shock Protein Response in Escherichia coli  
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Phage shock proteins (Psp) and their homologues are found in species from the three domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya (e.g. higher plants). In enterobacteria, the Psp response helps to maintain the proton motive force (PMF) of the cell when the inner membrane integrity is impaired. The presumed ability of ArcB to sense redox changes in the cellular quinone pool and the strong decrease of psp induction in ΔubiG or ΔarcAB backgrounds suggest a link between the Psp response and the quinone pool. The authors now provide evidence indicating that the physiological signal for inducing psp by secretin-induced stress is neither the quinone redox state nor a drop in PMF. Neither the loss of the H+-gradient nor the dissipation of the electrical potential alone is sufficient to induce the Psp response. A set of electron transport mutants differing in their redox states due to the lack of a NADH dehydrogenase and a quinol oxidase, but retaining a normal PMF displayed low levels of psp induction inversely related to oxidised ubiquinone levels under microaerobic growth and independent of PMF. In contrast, cells displaying higher secretin induced psp expression showed increased levels of ubiquinone. Taken together, this study suggests that not a single but likely multiple signals are needed to be integrated to induce the Psp response.
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