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Endovascular treatment of high-flow cervical direct vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistula with detachable coils and Onyx liquid embolic agent

Endovascular treatment of high-flow cervical direct vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistula with detachable coils and Onyx liquid embolic agent,10.10

Endovascular treatment of high-flow cervical direct vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistula with detachable coils and Onyx liquid embolic agent  
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We report the first experience in the treatment of high-flow cervical direct vertebro-vertebral arteriovenous fistula (VVAVF), which was successfully occluded with detachable coils and Onyx through transarterial approach. A 20-year-old female presented with 2-month history of paresis of bilateral extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the dilated ventral epidural veins as well as the dilated left paraspinal veins compressed the spinal cord. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated high-flow VVAVF between the left vertebral artery (VA) and the surrounding venous plexus at the C3 cervical level. The fistulas were also fed by backward flow from the right VA and left ascending cervical arteries. Transarterial endovascular treatment was performed by using detachable coils and Onyx; immediate angiographic obliteration was achieved. VVAVF-related symptoms resolved gradually, and there was complete neurologic recovery without clinical consequences on clinical follow-up. The fistulas remained closed, as ascertained by 2-month follow-up computed tomography angiography and MRI. No new neurological deficit related to the procedure was detected. The endovascular treatment of direct VVAVF with combination of detachable coils and Onyx is feasible, safe, and highly effective with low morbidity and mortality.
Journal: Acta Neurochirurgica - ACTA NEUROCHIR , vol. 153, no. 2, pp. 347-352, 2011
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