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In vitro galactation of human serum albumin: Analysis of the protein’s galactation sites by mass spectrometry

In vitro galactation of human serum albumin: Analysis of the protein’s galactation sites by mass spectrometry,10.1016/j.ab.2010.11.034,Analytical Bioc

In vitro galactation of human serum albumin: Analysis of the protein’s galactation sites by mass spectrometry   (Citations: 2)
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The posttranslational modification of proteins by sugars has been demonstrated in diabetes and classical galactosemia. In diabetes, the glycation process occurs as a result of d-glucose nonenzymatically reacting with proteins such as albumin and hemoglobin, used today as important tools to monitor the efficiency of dietary control and therapy during treatment of diabetes. In classical galactosemia, d-galactose contributes to the formation of glycated proteins as well, suggesting that, akin to diabetes with glucated proteins, the monitoring of galactated proteins may facilitate management of patients with galactosemia. The objectives of this study were (i) to galactate human serum albumin (HSA) in vitro; (ii) to determine, by a sodium borohydride-dependent mass peptide mapping method, the galactation sites in HSA; and (iii) to compare HSA’s galactation sites with the protein’s reported glucation sites. Treatment of galactated HSA with sodium borohydride stabilized the condensed sugars on the protein and yielded discrete fragmentation patterns by tandem mass spectrometry, allowing reliable identification of HSA’s galactation sites. Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry, in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, revealed that the principal sites of galactation in HSA were the ε-amino groups of lysine residues 12, 233, 281/276, 414, and 525. Lysyl residues 12, 233, 276, and 525 were previously reported as privileged sites for the nonenzymatic binding of d-glucose with HSA.
Journal: Analytical Biochemistry - ANAL BIOCHEM , vol. 410, no. 2, pp. 248-256, 2011
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