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Rolling element bearing diagnostics—A tutorial

Rolling element bearing diagnostics—A tutorial,10.1016/j.ymssp.2010.07.017,Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing,Robert B. Randall,Jérôme Antoni

Rolling element bearing diagnostics—A tutorial   (Citations: 4)
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This tutorial is intended to guide the reader in the diagnostic analysis of acceleration signals from rolling element bearings, in particular in the presence of strong masking signals from other machine components such as gears. Rather than being a review of all the current literature on bearing diagnostics, its purpose is to explain the background for a very powerful procedure which is successful in the majority of cases. The latter contention is illustrated by the application to a number of very different case histories, from very low speed to very high speed machines. The specific characteristics of rolling element bearing signals are explained in great detail, in particular the fact that they are not periodic, but stochastic, a fact which allows them to be separated from deterministic signals such as from gears. They can be modelled as cyclostationary for some purposes, but are in fact not strictly cyclostationary (at least for localised defects) so the term pseudo-cyclostationary has been coined. An appendix on cyclostationarity is included. A number of techniques are described for the separation, of which the discrete/random separation (DRS) method is usually most efficient. This sometimes requires the effects of small speed fluctuations to be removed in advance, which can be achieved by order tracking, and so this topic is also amplified in an appendix. Signals from localised faults in bearings are impulsive, at least at the source, so techniques are described to identify the frequency bands in which this impulsivity is most marked, using spectral kurtosis. For very high speed bearings, the impulse responses elicited by the sharp impacts in the bearings may have a comparable length to their separation, and the minimum entropy deconvolution technique may be found useful to remove the smearing effects of the (unknown) transmission path. The final diagnosis is based on “envelope analysis” of the optimally filtered signal, but despite the fact that this technique has been used for 40 years in analogue form, the advantages of more recent digital implementations are explained.
Journal: Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing - MECH SYST SIGNAL PROCESS , vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 485-520, 2011
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