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The important role of microwave receptors in bio-fuel production by microwave-induced pyrolysis of sewage sludge

The important role of microwave receptors in bio-fuel production by microwave-induced pyrolysis of sewage sludge,10.1016/j.wasman.2011.02.001,Waste Ma

The important role of microwave receptors in bio-fuel production by microwave-induced pyrolysis of sewage sludge   (Citations: 3)
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Microwave receptor plays an important role in the microwave pyrolysis of sewage sludge in view of its significant influence on the yield and property of bio-fuel products. The yield and the chemical compositions of bio-fuels (gases and oils) obtained from sewage sludge mixed with different receptors (graphite, residue char, active carbon or silicon carbide) were investigated in this study by Gas Chromatography (GC), Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The results showed that the use of silicon carbide gave rise to the highest final temperature of 1130°C, resulting in the highest yield of gas fraction (up to 63.2wt.%). The low heating rate (200°C/min) which was attributed to the addition of residue char promoted condensation reactions and resulted in an increase in solid yield. The existence of active carbon could prolong the resistance time of volatiles in the hot zone owing to its porous structure, generating the maximum concentration of H2+CO (60%) in the pyrolysis gas. When graphite was used, the final low temperature favoured the cyclization of the alkenes, giving rise to a higher concentration of mononuclear aromatics in the pyrolysis oils. The model established in this study revealed that the quantity and quality of the products obtained from the microwave pyrolysis highly depended on the process conditions, which were influenced by the receptor significantly.
Journal: Waste Management , vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 1321-1326, 2011
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