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Ultrasound and photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy using silica-coated gold nanorods: In-vivo study

Ultrasound and photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy using silica-coated gold nanorods: In-vivo study,10.1109/ULTSYM.2010.5935601,Seungsoo K

Ultrasound and photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy using silica-coated gold nanorods: In-vivo study  
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In nanoparticle mediated photothermal therapy, confirmation of nanoparticle delivery/deposition in a tumor before therapy and temperature monitoring during therapy are needed to optimize therapeutic outcomes. In this paper, we demonstrate that ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging techniques can plan and guide photothermal cancer therapy, using an in-vivo mouse model of subcutaneous cancer intravenously administrated with silica-coated gold nanorods. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging can be used to differentiate nanoparticles from biological tissue components such as oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (3). This technique is based on the unique wavelength-dependent optical absorption properties of each tissue component. Since the photoacoustic signal amplitude can be correlated with the highly tissue-dependent optical absorption coefficient, it is possible to analyze the distribution of tissue components. Therefore, spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging can be used for the confirmation of nanoparticle deposition in the tumor before therapy. Photoacoustic-based thermal imaging can be used to estimate temperature distribution during photothermal therapy (4). Because photoacoustic pressure is the function of temperature, it is possible to correlate photoacoustic signal amplitude changes with temperature changes. This non-invasive and real-time two-dimensional (2-D) temperature distribution imaging method can provide enough information to optimize therapeutic outcomes. In this paper, we demonstrate ultrasound and photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy using an in-vivo mouse model of cancer. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging was used to monitor nanoparticle delivery. Then, photoacoustic-based thermal imaging was used to monitor temperature during therapy.
Conference: Ultrasonics, IEEE Symposium - IUS , pp. 233-236, 2010
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