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MODELING DENITRIFICATION IN TERRESTRIAL AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS AT REGIONAL SCALES

MODELING DENITRIFICATION IN TERRESTRIAL AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS AT REGIONAL SCALES,10.1890/1051-0761(2006)016[2123:MDITAA]2.0.CO;2,Ecological Applicati

MODELING DENITRIFICATION IN TERRESTRIAL AND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS AT REGIONAL SCALES   (Citations: 43)
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Quantifying where, when, and how much denitrification occurs on the basis of measurements alone remains particularly vexing at virtually all spatial scales. As a result, models have become essential tools for integrating current understanding of the processes that control denitrification with measurements of rate-controlling properties so that the permanent losses of N within landscapes can be quantified at watershed and regional scales. In this paper, we describe commonly used approaches for modeling denitrification and N cycling processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems based on selected examples from the literature. We highlight future needs for developing complementary measurements and models of denitrification. Most of the approaches described here do not explicitly simulate microbial dynamics, but make predictions by representing the environmental conditions where denitrification is expected to occur, based on conceptualizations of the N cycle and empirical data from field and laboratory investigations of the dominant process controls. Models of denitrification in terrestrial ecosystems include generally similar rate-controlling variables, but vary in their complexity of the descriptions of natural and human-related properties of the landscape, reflecting a range of scientific and management perspectives. Models of denitrification in aquatic ecosystems range in complexity from highly detailed mechanistic simulations of the N cycle to simpler source-transport models of aggregate N removal processes estimated with empirical functions, though all estimate aquatic N removal using first-order reaction rate or mass-transfer rate expressions. Both the terrestrial and aquatic modeling approaches considered here generally indicate that denitrification is an important and highly substantial component of the N cycle over large spatial scales. However, the uncertainties of model predictions are large. Future progress will be linked to advances in field measurements, spatial databases, and model structures.
Journal: Ecological Applications - ECOL APPL , vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 2123-2142, 2006
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    • ...It is generally known that denitrification is favored under suboxic conditions or in anoxic microenvironments (Boyer et al. 2006)...

    Kyung Won Seoet al. Soil moisture condition and soil nitrogen dynamics in a pure Alnus jap...

    • ...terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems can be estimated with first-order reaction rates (Boyer et al., 2006)...

    Amy E. ScaroniJohnet al. Comparison of denitrification characteristics among three habitat type...

    • ... with the global carbon cycle [Gruber and Galloway, 2008] because of (1) the rapid turnover of reactive N in terrestrial ecosystems, rendering it difficult to observe the desired quantities (e.g., net mineralization rates); (2) technical challenges in observing the complete N budget at the site scale; (3) the scarcity of suitable observations on reactive trace gas and leaching losses to scale these up to regional and global estimates [Boyer et ...

    S. Zaehleet al. Carbon and nitrogen cycle dynamics in the O-CN land surface model: 2. ...

    • ...Recent progress in the measurement and modeling of denitrification in lotic ecosystems includes reachscale measurements that account for hyporheic effects (e.g., Bo ¨hlke et al. 2004; Mulholland et al. 2004, 2008) and empirical and mechanistic models of aquatic denitrification that quantify nitrogen removal over watershed scales (Boyer et al. 2006)...
    • ...Biogeochemical cycles in aquatic ecosystems affect (and are affected by) conditions in the water column and streambed, including stream temperature, the supply of biogenic nutrients (e.g., nitrate, organic carbon, dissolved oxygen), respiration rates, and stream temperature, which all influence the magnitudes and rates of denitrification (Boyer et al. 2006)...
    • ... 2006; Birgand et al. 2007), the effects of denitrification on nitrogen removal in river networks at regional scales have been primarily inferred from empirical relations that correlate the rates of nutrient removal with mean annual discharge and related hydraulic measures for streams and lakes (e.g., water velocity, depth, time of travel; Howarth et al. 1996; Alexander et al. 2000, 2008; Donner et al. 2002; ; Seitzinger et al. 2002; Boyer et ...
    • ...The predicted response of the benthic areal rates is generally consistent with the effects of discharge on denitrification, related to water and nitrate contact with benthic sediments in hyporheic zones (Peterson et al. 2001; Boyer et al. 2006; Mulholland et al. 2009)...
    • ...Such sampling would also improve the linkages between the experimental field data and watershed scale nutrient models (e.g., SPARROW, SWAT, THMB/IBIS; see Boyer et al. 2006)...

    Richard B. Alexanderet al. Dynamic modeling of nitrogen losses in river networks unravels the cou...

    • ...Boyer et al. (2006) reviewed several modeling approaches and concluded that the models indicate a large role of denitrification in regional and global N budgets, but that model uncertainty is large, and that more extensive and intensive denitrification measurements are needed to better validate and improve existing models...

    Mark B. Davidet al. Modeling denitrification in a tile-drained, corn and soybean agroecosy...

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