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Simple, ontology-based representation of biomedical statements through fine-granular entity tagging and new web standards

Simple, ontology-based representation of biomedical statements through fine-granular entity tagging and new web standards,Matthias Samwald,Holger Sten

Simple, ontology-based representation of biomedical statements through fine-granular entity tagging and new web standards   (Citations: 3)
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The number of web applications that enable end-users (such as biomedical researchers) to employ ontologies and Semantic Web technologies for formulating, publishing and finding information on the web in a practical manner is surprisingly small. In this paper we present a prototype of the aTag system which aims to drastically lower the entry barriers to the biomedical Semantic Web. aTags ('associative tags') are short snippets of XHTML+RDFa with embedded RDF/OWL based on the SIOC vocabulary and domain ontologies and taxonomies (OBO ontologies and DBpedia). The structure of the embedded RDF/OWL is decidedly simple: a very short piece of human-readable text that is 'tagged' with relevant ontological entities. An aTag generator can be easily added to any web browser and allows researchers to quickly generate aTags out of key statements from web pages, such as PubMed abstracts. The resulting aTags can be embedded anywhere on the web, for example on blogs, wikis, or biomedical databases. We demonstrate how the resulting statements that are distributed over the web can be searched, visualized and aggregated with Semantic Web / Linked Data tools, and discuss how aTags can be used to answer practically relevant biomedical questions even though their structure is very simple. The aTag project is carried out in cooperation with the BioRDF task force of the Semantic Web for Health Care and Life Science Interest Group of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).
Published in 2009.
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