Academic
Publications
Stable Inheritance of Host Species-Derived Microchromosomes in the Gynogenetic Fish Poecilia formosa

Stable Inheritance of Host Species-Derived Microchromosomes in the Gynogenetic Fish Poecilia formosa,10.1534/genetics.107.076893,Genetics,Indrajit Nan

Stable Inheritance of Host Species-Derived Microchromosomes in the Gynogenetic Fish Poecilia formosa   (Citations: 7)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
B chromosomes are additional, usually unstable constituents of the genome of many organisms. Their origin, however, is often unclear and their evolutionary relevance is not well understood. They may range from being deleterious to neutral or even beneficial. We have followed the genetic fate of B chromosomes in the asexual, all-female fish Poecilia formosa over eight generations. In this species, B chromosomes come in the form of one to three tiny microchromosomes derived from males of the host species that serve as sperm donors for this gynogenetic species. All microchromosomes have centromeric heterochromatin but usually only one has a telomere. Such microchromosomes are stably inherited, while the telomereless are prone to be lost in both the soma and germline. In some cases the stable microchromosome carries a functional gene lending support to the hypothesis that the B chromosomes in P. formosa could increase the genetic diversity of the clonal lineage in this ameiotic organism and to some degree counteract the genomic decay that is supposed to be connected with the lack of recombination.
Journal: Genetics , vol. 177, no. 2, pp. 917-926, 2007
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
    • ...Further studies (Schartl et al. 1995; Nanda et al. 2007) indicated that the males of this kind of gynogenetic species resulted from the microchromosomes derived from the related bisexual host species...

    Shaojun Liuet al. Evidence for the Formation of the Male Gynogenetic Fish

    • ...An effect of different prior experience is unlikely here because all P. formosa were reared under identical conditions, i.e., with uniformly black males (“black mollies”, a domesticated strain of Poecilia sphenops) as sperm donors (as part of another project: Nanda et al. 2007)...
    • ...In clonal, but spermdependent (gynogenetic) species, genetic variation may arise through mitotic recombination (Tiedemann et al. 2005; Mandegar and Otto 2007), especially in conjunction with the occasional transfer of subgenomic amounts of DNA (microchromosomes) by host males (Schartl et al. 1995b; Lamatsch et al. 2004; Nanda et al. 2007 )o r by adding a whole sperm haplome to elevate ploidy (Balsano et al. 1972)...

    Jens R. Poschadelet al. Divergent female mating preference in a clonal fish

Sort by: