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Damping Low Frequency Oscillation by HVDC Supplementary Control In an AC/DC Parallel Transmission Power System

Damping Low Frequency Oscillation by HVDC Supplementary Control In an AC/DC Parallel Transmission Power System,Xiaoming Jin,Bo Peng Chen Chen

Damping Low Frequency Oscillation by HVDC Supplementary Control In an AC/DC Parallel Transmission Power System  
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SUMMARY The paper presents the study on low frequency oscillation (LFO) mitigation in an interconnected power system with AC/DC parallel transmission lines (1). The Small Signal Stability Analysis software SSAP is developed for largescale power system LFO analysis. Eigen-analysis of linearized power system show that both inter-area modes and local modes of LFO exist (0.2Hz<frequency< 2.0Hz), furthermore, weak damping (e.g.damping ratio <0.05) make the power system operate under the potential of oscillation. Eigenvector of each mode shows the generators are divided into groups, which may oscillate against one another. The types of division are different and each type related to one special oscillation mode. Power System Stabilizer (PSS)s as traditional approach to mitigate LSO were already equipped in excitation systems of all the large capacity generators and show their effectiveness. The paper studies how to apply the supplementary control of HVDC to further enhance the damping of inter-area modes and suppress LFO. Double-side AC frequency difference control for each HVDC is called the frequency difference modulation. Power flow and current in AC tie line and voltage at AC bus or their combination may be choosen as remote control sigals. Case study of coordinate control takes the summation of active power flow in 3 different AC tie lines acquired by Phase Measurement Unit System (PMU) as input signal for both sides of 3 HVDCs. Eigen-analysis shows the designated coordinate control is significantly effective to the critical oscillation modes.
Published in 2009.
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