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New palaeogeographic and lake-level reconstructions of Lake Tanganyika: implications for tectonic, climatic and biological evolution in a rift lake

New palaeogeographic and lake-level reconstructions of Lake Tanganyika: implications for tectonic, climatic and biological evolution in a rift lake,10

New palaeogeographic and lake-level reconstructions of Lake Tanganyika: implications for tectonic, climatic and biological evolution in a rift lake   (Citations: 66)
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Palaeogeographic and lake-level reconstructions provide powerful tools for evaluating competing scenarios of biotic, climatic and geological evolution within a lake basin. Here we present new reconstructions for the northern Lake Tanganyika subbasins, based on reflection seismic, core and outcrop data. Reflection seismic radiocarbon method (RSRM) age estimates provide a chronological model for these reconstructions, against which yet to be obtained age dates based on core samples can be compared. A complex history of hydrological connections and changes in shoreline configuration in northern Lake Tanganyika has resulted from a combination of volcanic doming, border fault evolution and climatically induced lake-level fluctuations. The stratigraphic expression of lake-level highstands and lowstands in Lake Tanganyika is predictable and cyclic (referred to here as Capart Cycles), but in a pattern that diers profoundly from the classic Van Houten cycles of some Newark Supergroup rift basins. This dierence results from the extraordinary topographic relief of the Western Rift lakes, coupled with the rapidity of large-scale lake-level fluctuations. Major unconformity surfaces associated with Lake Tanganyika lowstands may have corresponded with high-latitude glacial maxima throughout much of the mid- to late Pleistocene. Rocky shorelines along the eastern side of the present-day Ubwari Peninsula (Zaire) appear to have had a much more continuous existence as littoral rock habitats than similar areas along the north-western coastline of the lake (adjacent to the Uvira Border Fault System), which in turn are older than the rocky shorelines of the north-east coast of Burundi. This model of palaeogeographic history will be of great help to biologists trying to clarify the evolution of endemic invertebrates and fish in the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika.
Journal: Basin Research - BASIN RES , vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 107-132, 1997
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    • ...basin after its formation (9-12 Myr) [1], but prior to full lacustrine conditions (5-6 Myr) [43], although the lower dating estimate occurs post deep-water conditions, corroborating the hypothesis that LT is a diversification hotspot...

    Katherine J Brownet al. Mastacembelid eels support Lake Tanganyika as an evolutionary hotspot ...

    • ...No fewer than thirteen sediment-core based analyses have been published on the subject, with interpreted estimates of lake level decline ranging from 150‐600 m (e.g., Livingstone 1965; Hecky and Degens 1973; Haberyan and Hecky 1987; Tiercelin et al. 1989; Gasse et al. 1989; Tiercelin and Mondeguer 1991; Williamson et al. 1991; Vincens et al. 1993; Chalie 1995; Lezzar et al. 1996; Bergonzini et al. 1997; Cohen et al. 1997; Scholz et al. ...
    • ...have permitted only minimum age estimates for Quaternary lake level fluctuations (e.g., Lezzar et al. 1996; Cohen et al. 1997)...
    • ...Correlation with prior seismic results from the Bujumbura and Mpulungu Basins suggests that the ‘‘a’’ discontinuity (Lezzar et al. 1996; Cohen et al. 1997) and the ‘‘A’’ event (e.g., Tiercelin et al. 1989) in northern and southern Tanganyika, respectively are coeval with the base of Sequence A. Using the more precise KH3 chronology, we suggest that the time content of Sequence A is appreciably greater than the *35.3‐ 39.7 ka inferred from ...
    • ...Prior research has suggested a sub-aerial exposure surface indicative of a regression event that lowered lake level by more than 600 m (Scholz and Rosendahl 1988; Cohen et al. 1997)...
    • ...Cohen et al. (1997) suggested that the lowstand implied by these features reduced lake level by *160 m, desiccating the Bay of Burton...

    Michael M. McGlueet al. Seismic records of late Pleistocene aridity in Lake Tanganyika, tropic...

    • ...With an age of 9‐12 million years (Cohen et al., 1993, 1997) and a maximum depth of 1,470 m, Lake Tanganyika is the second-oldest and second-deepest...

    Christian Sturmbaueret al. Abundance, distribution, and territory areas of rock-dwelling Lake Tan...

    • ...With an age of 9‐12 MY and the establishment of a real lacustrine habitat with deep water conditions about 5‐6 MYA Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the three East African Great Lakes (Cohen et al., 1993, 1997)...

    Christian Sturmbaueret al. Variation of territory size and defense behavior in breeding pairs of ...

    • ...LT has experienced fluctuations in lake level [19], but unlike LM and LV, is not thought to have experienced near or complete desiccation...

    Julia J. Dayet al. Tempo and Mode of Diversification of Lake Tanganyika Cichlid Fishes

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