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Workload, Control, and Social Support Effects on Serum Lipids: A Longitudinal Study Among Apparently Healthy Employed Adults

Workload, Control, and Social Support Effects on Serum Lipids: A Longitudinal Study Among Apparently Healthy Employed Adults,10.1037/a0015283,Journal

Workload, Control, and Social Support Effects on Serum Lipids: A Longitudinal Study Among Apparently Healthy Employed Adults  
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The authors investigated the direct and interactive effects of the job demand– control–support (JDC-S) model’s components on subsequent changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides (TRI) separately for male and female employees. In contrast to all 14 past studies on these relationships, the authors used a longitudinal design. Study participants (N = 1,137, 66% men) were all apparently healthy employees who underwent a routine health check at 2 points in time (Time 1 and Time 2) about 22 months apart. In these analyses, the authors controlled for the Time 1 level of each criterion and for other confounders. Most of the direct and moderating effects found did not support the predictions of the JDC-S model; this finding is in agreement with the majority of past cross-sectional studies. The authors did not find any evidence supporting the existence of a reverse causation for either of the components of the JDC-S model. The authors suggest that serum lipids may not be a physiological mechanism mediating the effects of the JDC-S model on atherosclerotic diseases.
Journal: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology - J OCCUP HEALTH PSYCHOL , vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 349-364, 2009
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