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Does a History of Trauma Contribute to HIV Risk for Women of Color? Implications for Prevention and Policy

Does a History of Trauma Contribute to HIV Risk for Women of Color? Implications for Prevention and Policy,Gail E. Wyatt,Hector F. Myers,John K. Willi

Does a History of Trauma Contribute to HIV Risk for Women of Color? Implications for Prevention and Policy   (Citations: 91)
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Objectives. We investigated history of abuse and other HIV-related risk factors in a community sam- ple of 490 HIV-positive and HIV-negative African American, European American, and Latina women. Methods. Baseline interviews were analyzed, and logistic regressions were used to identify predic- tors of risk for positive HIV serostatus overall and by racial/ethnic group. Results. Race/ethnicity was not an independent predictor of HIV-related risk, and few racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for HIV were seen. Regardless of race/ethnicity, HIV-positive women had more sexual partners, more sexually transmitted diseases, and more severe histories of abuse than did HIV- negative women. Trauma history was a general risk factor for women, irrespective of race/ethnicity. Conclusions. Limited material resources, exposure to violence, and high-risk sexual behaviors were the best predictors of HIV risk. (Am J Public Health. 2002;92:660-665)
Published in 2002.
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